Charudutt Mishra

Scientist, High Altitudes

P1300316

Ph.D. Ecology and Resource Conservation, Wageningen University
M.Sc. Wildlife Sciences, Wildlife Institute of India

Charudutt Mishra is the Science and Conservation Director of the Snow Leopard Trust, responsible for guiding research and conservation programmes in snow leopard range countries of Asia. He also serves as the Executive Director of the Snow Leopard Network, a worldwide organization of leading snow leopard experts and over 500 member individuals and institutions. Charu is a Founder Trustee of the Nature Conservation Foundation. He serves on the editorial boards of the journals Animal Conservation and Oryx, on the winner selection panel of the Whitley Awards, and is a member of the IUCN’s Cat Specialist Group. Charu has a Ph.D. in Ecology and Natural Resource Conservation from the Resource Ecology Group, Wageningen University (The Netherlands), MSc degree in Wildlife Sciences from the Wildlife Institute of India, and BSc. in Zoology from the University of Delhi (India).

Projects

P1120807

Big cat chow

What snow leopards eat: predation on livestock and wild ungulates

Dsc02937

Cashmere and Kiang

Conflict between the kiang and pastoralists in Ladakh

Dsc04574

From science to policy

Project Snow Leopard: towards a national conservation policy

Bundesarchiv bild 135 s 05 13 21  tibetexpedition  gazellenbock

Gazelles on the brink

Local extinction looms large for the Tibetan gazelle

A ncbs 40d

Gazing upon graziers

Understanding wildlife conservation and pastoralism

Dsc02000

Goats and Wild Goats

Forage tussles between Himalayan ibex and livestock

Dscn6646

Completed

Kitchen Stories

Understanding how Nicobar communities share resources in the wake of the tsunami

Arunachal macaque photo by kripaljyoti mazumdar

Monkey of the deep jungle

Ecology and conservation of Macaca munzala

Dscn9469

People, livestock and snow leopards

Unique livestock insurance schemes betters prospects for herders and carnivores

A ncbs 31e

Plants, herbivores and communities

Rangeland dynamics in the Trans-Himalaya

Red 20fox 20in 20gete 20village  20spiti  20hp ag

Completed

Response of red fox to village expansion

How does red fox respond to increasing village size in the Trans-Himalaya?

Dsc 1033

Shared pastures

How mountain ungulates of the trans-Himalaya live together

Walking 20snow 20leopard 20sign 20transect 20above 205 000m

Snow leopard and prey distribution

Factors affecting snow leopard & wild-prey at multiple scales 

Sl 20cam 20trap 201

Snow leopard - prey dynamics

Understanding impact of wild prey availability on snow leopard killing livestock

Argali 20adult 20male

Completed

Status of the Tibetan Argali

Aiding the survival of an endangered sheep

Schraubenziege   markhor

Completed

War and wild goats

Conservation of the Pir Panjal markhor in Kashmir

P1490789

Wild carnivores and people

Understanding human response towards snow leopards and wolves

Publications

  • Journal Article
    In press
    Serow Nemorhaedus sumatraensis
    In: A. J. T. Johnsingh and N. Manjrekar (eds.) Mammals of South Asia: ecology, behaviour and conservation. Permanent Black, Delhi.
  • Journal Article
    In press
    Goral Nemorhaedus goral
    In: A. J. T. Johnsingh and N. Manjrekar (eds.) Mammals of South Asia: ecology, behaviour and conservation. Permanent Black, Delhi.
  • Book Chapter
    In press
    Conflicts over snow leopard conservation and livestock production
    Conservation Conflicts, Redpath S, Young J, Gutierrez R, Wood K (eds.), Cambridge University Press.
  • Report
    2017
    Valuation of Ecosystem Services in Snow Leopard Landscapes of Asia
    Charudutt Mishra, Koustubh Sharma, Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Muhammad Ali Nawaz, Kubanychbek Jumabay-Uulu, Venera Amankul Kizi, Uzma Saeed, Purevjav Lkhagvajav, Ranjini Murali
    Murali, R., Lkhagvajav, P., Saeed, U., Kizi, V.A., Zhumbai-Uulu, K., Nawaz, M.A., Bhatnagar, Y.V., Sharma, K., Mishra, C. 2017. Valuation of ecosystem services in snow leopard landscapes of Asia. Snow Leopard Trust, Nature Conservation Foundation, Snow Leopard Conservation Foundation, Snow Leopard Foundation Kyrgyzstan, and Snow Leopard Foundation Pakistan. Report Submitted to the Global Environment Facility (GEF) funded United Nations Development Program (UNDP) project on Transboundary Cooperation for Snow Leopard and Ecosystem Conservation.
    Download

    PDF, 15.2 MB

  • Journal Article
    2017
    The value of ecosystem services in the high altitude Spiti Valley, Indian Trans-Himalaya
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.10.018
    Download

    PDF, 645 KB

    The high mountain ranges of South and Central Asia are increasingly being exposed to large-scale development projects. These areas are home to traditional pastoralist communities and internationally important biodiversity including the endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia. Development projects rely on economic cost-benefit analysis, but the ecosystem services in the high Himalayas are poorly understood and are rarely accounted for. As a first step to fill this gap, we identified the main ecosystem services used by local people in the Trans-Himalayan Spiti Valley (7591 km2), a region important for conservation of snow leopards and high mountain biodiversity, and undertook an economic valuation. Stakeholders identified a range of services, though these were dominated by provisioning services identified by 90% of respondents. Only 5.4% of the respondents recognised regulatory services and 4.8% recognised cultural services. The mean economic value of provisioning services was estimated at US$ 3622 ± 149 HH−1 yr−1, which was 3.8 times higher than the average annual household income. Our results underscore the need to account for ecosystem services in the cost-benefit analyses of large-scale development projects in addition to assessments of their environmental and social impact.

  • Book Chapter
    2017
    Birds in Relation to Farming and Livestock Grazing in the Indian Trans-Himalayas
    In Bird Migration across the Himalayas: Wetland Functioning amidst Mountains and Glaciers
    Download

    PDF, 194 KB

  • Dataset
    2017
    Data from: Assessing changes in distribution of the endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia and its wild prey over 2 decades in the Indian Himalaya through interview-based occupancy surveys.
    DOI: https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.hp4b3

    The data set has occupancy values and local extinction probability values for 88 grids/sites of 15km X 15km each, for snow leopard, blue sheep, Asiatic ibex and wild prey (blue sheep and ibex combined), across an area of 14,616 sq.km in the Himalaya and Trans-Himalaya mountains of Himachal Pradesh, India.

  • Journal Article
    2017
    Assessing changes in distribution of the Endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia and its wild prey over 2 decades in the Indian Himalaya through interviewbased occupancy surveys
    doi:10.1017/S0030605317001107
    Download

    PDF, 585 KB

    Understanding species distributions, patterns of change and threats can form the basis for assessing the conservation status of elusive species that are difficult to survey. The snow leopard Panthera uncia is the top predator of the Central and South Asian mountains. Knowledge of the distribution and status of this elusive felid and its wild prey is limited. Using recall-based key-informant interviews we estimated site use by snow leopards and their primary wild prey, blue sheep Pseudois nayaur and Asiatic ibex Capra sibirica, across two time periods (past: –; recent: –) in the state of Himachal Pradesh, India. We also conducted a threat assessment for the recent period. Probability of site use was similar across the two time periods for snow leopards, blue sheep and ibex, whereas for wild prey (blue sheep and ibex combined) overall there was an % contraction. Although our surveys were conducted in areas within the presumed distribution range of the snow leopard, we found snow leopards were using only % of the area (, km). Blue sheep and ibex had distinct distribution ranges. Snow leopards and their wild prey were not restricted to protected areas, which encompassed only % of their distribution within the study area. Migratory livestock grazing was pervasive across ibex distribution range and was the most widespread and serious conservation threat. Depredation by free-ranging dogs, and illegal hunting and wildlife trade were the other severe threats. Our results underscore the importance of community-based, landscape- scale conservation approaches and caution against reliance on geophysical and opinion-based distribution maps that have been used to estimate national and global snow leopard ranges.

  • Journal Article
    2017
    Impact of wild prey availability on livestock predation by snow leopards. 
    Royal Society Open Science, 4(6), 170026.
    Download

    PDF, 566 KB

    An increasing proportion of the world's poor is rearing livestock today, and the global livestock population is growing. Livestock predation by large carnivores and their retaliatory killing is becoming an economic and conservation concern. A common recommendation for carnivore conservation and for reducing predation on livestock is to increase wild prey populations based on the assumption that the carnivores will consume this alternative food. Livestock predation, however, could either reduce or intensify with increases in wild prey depending on prey choice and trends in carnivore abundance. We show that the extent of livestock predation by the endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia intensifies with increases in the density of wild ungulate prey, and subsequently stabilizes. We found that snow leopard density, estimated at seven sites, was a positive linear function of the density of wild ungulates—the preferred prey—and showed no discernible relationship with livestock density. We also found that modelled livestock predation increased with livestock density. Our results suggest that snow leopard conservation would benefit from an increase in wild ungulates, but that would intensify the problem of livestock predation for pastoralists. The potential benefits of increased wild prey abundance in reducing livestock predation can be overwhelmed by a resultant increase in snow leopard populations. Snow leopard conservation efforts aimed at facilitating increases in wild prey must be accompanied by greater assistance for better livestock protection and offsetting the economic damage caused by carnivores.

  • Dataset
    2017
    Data from: Impact of wild prey availability on livestock predation by snow leopards
    Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi, Steve Redpath, Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Uma Ramakrishnan, Vaibhav Chaturvedi, Sophie Smout, Charudutt Mishra
    Data Dryad: doi:10.5061/dryad.8p689

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